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Ai-Da, an AI guided robot, is set to hold its first art exhibition | News | LIVING LIFE FEARLESS
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Ai-Da, an AI guided robot, is set to hold its first art exhibition

The whole concept behind this project tests the current boundaries of art, real life and fiction

Ada Lovelace was a Victorian-age mathematician who is considered as one of the pioneers of programming. Now, Ai-Da, an AI-driven humanoid robot named after her is to hold ‘its’ first art exhibition in the British university town of Oxford during June 2019. The exhibition will include Ai-Da’s framed pencil drawings, and as reported: “alongside paintings generated from her perception of objects and scenes she’s observed in the world.” There will also be small statues of her rendered in bronze “based on scans she’s taken of her own figure.”

Of course, there will be Ai-Da herself, the humanoid robot with an AI brain. She is constructed by researchers from the universities of Oxford and Leeds, and British Robotics company Engineers Arts and based on the initial ideas of Aidan Miller, a director of his own gallery in Oxford.

As CNET explains, Ai-Da’s “voice and her face aren’t based on any one human being. Instead, they offer up a blend of features from a variety of contributors,” and Miller insists that it was vital that she takes shape in a humanoid form.

Miller explains, “When you look at art, it is through the lens of an artist. If we didn’t have a humanoid one, it would be far more difficult to relate to the artist. This is an AI algorithm, it is entirely creative — we do not know what the outcome will be.”

While Ai-Da’s drawings are controlled by AI, the displayed paintings are collaborations with humans “who guide Ai-Da’s perceptions of the world through algorithms that generate a visually appealing piece of art.”

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