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The new year brings with it a slew of new movies, but before we get to those, I think we need to talk about the fact that one of 2017’s best films was based on what’s lovingly referred to as – the worst movie of all time.

Well, I think ‘best worst movie of all time’ would be a fairer title.

The Room, almost ironically, has found its way to the path to success in the form of a massive cult following and regular (and rowdy) midnight screenings.

The Room was directed, written, AND produced by Hollywood’s weirdo extraordinaire, Tommy Wiseau (he also starred in it, but we’re still trying to forget that ever happened). It’s not even worth trying to summarize the plot, considering that the story lines that resemble anything logical are as boring as watching paint dry, and any of the other points are just plain useless.

It premiered in 2003 and practically nobody cared, but still The Room, almost ironically, has found its way on the path to success in the form of a massive cult following and regular (and rowdy) midnight screenings.

Let’s just say that Mr. Wiseau is a fantastic example of following your dreams to to their fullest extent.

Franco & crew transforms disaster into quality

Almost 15 years have passed since ‘the best worst movie of all time’ hit theater (yes, just one movie theater), and a movie based on a book about the making of Wiseau’s movie is having far better luck than the original.

Star power is one of the key elements that has catapulted The Disaster Artist to unthinkable heights, with James Franco not only producing, but also starring as the mysterious and thick-accented Wiseau. Supporting cast members like Dave Franco, Seth Rogen, and Alison Brie certainly add a level of legit-ness to the production as a whole.

Glowing reviews, critical acclaim, and (so far) one award win for The Disaster Artist begs the question(s):

What does Tommy Wiseau think of all of it?

And what exactly does it mean that a movie about the ‘best worst movie of all time’ actually turned out to be both an entertaining and unexpectedly uplifting film?

Oh, irony

That’s where the beautiful irony of the situation comes into play. Something truly great and weirdly inspiring sprung from the head of what most consider to be a complete and utter failure.

A popular theory about The Room, which is referenced in The Disaster Artist, muses that it’s an autobiographical piece. We may never know if this is true, just like we may never discover Wiseau’s country of origin or real age, but it just goes to show that the ‘story behind the story’ is more compelling than what ended up in the final cut of his highly overpriced film.

…we may never discover Wiseau’s country of origin or real age, but it just goes to show that the ‘story behind the story’ is more compelling than what ended up in the final cut…

I like to think that Wiseau is infatuated by the fact that he’s linked to such a project, seeing as all he ever wanted was to make it in Hollywood. You know, regardless of the way in which he attained that dream.

Tommy Wiseau may not have struck gold with The Room, and he certainly won’t be remembered for his acting chops (the lack thereof, most likely), but The Disaster Artist affirms that his spirit and dedication have subconsciously produced a film far greater than anything he could have ever dreamed of.

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